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How to use HTML 3.2

CONTENTS How to Use
HTML 3.2

Scott Arpajian And Robert Mullen


CONTENTS

Introduction



Chapter 1   Understanding the World Wide Web

Chapter 2   HTML and the Web



Chapter 3   Getting Started with HTML

Chapter 4   Understanding the Basics of HTML

Chapter 5   Formatting Text

TRY IT!

Chapter 6   Using Hypertext Links

Chapter 7   Creating Lists in HTML

Chapter 8   Adding Graphics to HTML

TRY IT!

Chapter 9   Advanced Graphics Techniques

Chapter 10   Getting Feedback with Forms

Chapter 11   Using Tables

TRY IT!

Chapter 12   Creating Clickable Images

Chapter 13   Using the Netscape Extensions

TRY IT!

Chapter 14   Using Netscape Frames

Chapter 15   Using the Internet Explorer Extensions

TRY IT!

Chapter 16   Converting Existing Documents to HTML

Chapter 17   Working with Multiple HTML Documents

Chapter 18   The Future of HTML

Appendix   HTML Quick Reference

Credits


HTML conversion by :
    M/s. LeafWriters (India) Pvt. Ltd.
    Website : http://leaf.stpn.soft.net
    e-mail : leafwriters@leaf.stpn.soft.net


Development EditorKelly Green
Copy EditorsMargo Hill and Nicole Clausing
Technical ReviewerWayne Ause
Project CoordinatorMadhu Prasher
Cover Illustration and DesignRegan Honda
Book DesignDennis Gallagher/Visual Strategies, San Francisco
Screen Graphics EditorPipi Diamond
Word ProcessingHoward Blechman
Page LayoutM.D. Barrera
IndexerValerie Robbins


Copyright © 1996 by Macmillan Computer Publishing USA. All rights reserved.

PART OF A CONTINUING SERIES

All other product names and services identified throughout this book are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies. They are used throughout this book in editorial fashion only and for the benefit of such companies. No such uses, or the use of any trade name, is intended to convey endorsement or other affiliation with the book.

No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form, or stored in a database or retrieval system, or transmitted or distributed in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of Macmillan Computer Publishing USA, except as permitted by the Copyright Act of 1976, and except that program listings may be entered, stored, and executed in a computer system.

THE INFORMATION AND MATERIAL CONTAINED IN THIS BOOK ARE PROVIDED "AS IS," WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION ANY WARRANTY CONCERNING THE ACCURACY, ADEQUACY, OR COMPLETENESS OF SUCH INFORMATION OR MATERIAL OR THE RESULTS TO BE OBTAINED FROM USING SUCH INFORMATION OR MATERIAL. NEITHER MACMILLAN COMPUTER PUBLISHING USA NOR THE AUTHOR SHALL BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY CLAIMS ATTRIBUTABLE TO ER-RORS, OMISSIONS, OR OTHER INACCURACIES IN THE INFORMATION OR MATERIAL CONTAINED IN THIS BOOK, AND IN NO EVENT SHALL MACMILLAN COMPUTER PUBLISHING USA OR THE AUTHOR BE LIABLE FOR DIRECT, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF THE USE OF SUCH INFORMATION OR MATERIAL.

ISBN 1-56276-496-9


Introduction

The World Wide Web is exploding all around us, and it shows no signs of slowing down. Chances are that if you've opened the book to this page, you're already familiar with the Internet in general and the World Wide Web in particular. You've probably al-ready explored what the Web has to offer, and like millions of others, you've become hooked by its limitless information and exciting content. In fact, you've probably even thought about publishing your own home page on the Web.

Surprisingly, publishing on the Web is easy. The backbone of the World Wide Web is the Hypertext Markup Language, often simply re-ferred to as HTML. This is the language that is used to create Web pages, and it is the glue that holds all of the pieces of the Web together. Despite its power and flexibility, HTML is simple to understand and write. HTML is not complicated, and it doesn't require special compilers or tools. In fact, you can write HTML just as we did for this book-using the Windows Notepad.

How to Use HTML 3.2 is an illustrated tutorial that will teach you the fundamentals of HTML. It starts with the basics, and then moves on to the more advanced concepts. Along the way, you'll get the chance to practice your skills in a series of exercises known as Try-Its. By the time you complete this book, you'll be an accomplished HTML author. Even when you finish reading the book, you can continue to use it as a reference and guide as you publish your own documents on the Web.

The Web is an exciting medium, and it levels the playing field for electronic publishing. Anyone can publish on the Web. There are very few obstacles, and no special tools are required. All you need is a working knowledge of HTML, some disk space on a Web server, and a whole lot of ambition. This book will teach you everything you need to know about creating HTML content on the World Wide Web. The rest is up to you.